Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Selling Flint's water? Art installation raises funds and awareness for Flint, Detroit water victims

My bottle of Flint water
(originally published 10/1017 in Model D)

Art, which plays so many different roles in life, has long been used and understood as a means of social critique. We have come to expect that the work of a great many artists will illuminate inequity, draw attention to the malfeasance of corporations and elected officials, and start provocative conversations about the many social struggles and structural biases that continue to plague society.

But what if art could do more? What if it could make a difference, in ways more traditionally associated with political and community action? What if it could be used to improve lives and ameliorate social problems not abstractly, but concretely?

These are big questions for contemporary art, which is witnessing the ascent of what is variously termed "social practice" or "public intervention" art—that is, art that seeks to intentionally intervene in the wider world for the material betterment of individuals and communities.

One such intervention is the "Flint Water Project," a multifaceted installation/performance piece by the Chicago-based artist William Pope.Lcurrently on view at What Pipeline, an artist-run gallery in southwest Detroit. For six weeks, the 1,000 square foot gallery is serving as a makeshift production facility, showroom, and storefront. The product being prepared and sold is tap water from Flint, Michigan.

Proceeds from all sales will be donated to the United Way of Genessee County, which has pledged to use the money to mitigate the effects of the ongoing Flint water crisis, and to Hydrate Detroit, which fights water shutoffs in Detroit. Visitors can walk out the door with an unsigned 16-ounce bottle for $20, a bottle signed by Pope.L for $250, or a case for a sum that's more in line with traditional art world prices. The goal is to raise $100,000.

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